Best Gardens of Japan

1. Kenrokuen Built in Kanazawa for the enjoyment of the former feudal lords, Kenrokuen feels like a collection of multiple excellent gardens that include a variety of ponds, streams, hills, groves, flower gardens and several pavilions and tea houses. More
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Photos Of The Most Beautiful Japanese Cherry Blossoms

The delicate pink sakura, or cherry blossom, is associated primarily with the culture of its native Japan. These trees blossom throughout Japan every spring, but their beauty never gets old, so we’ve collected some of our favorite photos of this year’s cherry blossoms in Japan.

In Japan, the blossoming of the sakura begins in April, when students go back to school or people go back to work after the holidays. Japan’s national weather service even tracks the movement of the “sakura front,” which is an imaginary line that travels south-to-north every season and heralds the blooming of the sakura. This line’s progression in Japan is marked on this convenient sakura calendar.

The cherry blossom is tied to the ancient Japanese tradition of hanami, or picnicking under a sakura tree. The fact that the cherry blossom has heavily featured in ancient Japanese art has made it a staple of both historical and modern Japanese aesthetic. Although it is also native to China and Korea, it is generally associated primarily with Japanese culture, which is why it often accompanies the Japanese diaspora into cities around the world.

While sakuras are probably best viewed with a Japanese castle, mountain or garden in the backdrop, they might also be planted somewhere in your city as well. They provide a great opportunity to go have a beautiful springtime picnic!

Image credits: 紅襪熊

 

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Know your sakura: Japan’s three best cherry blossom trees

SoraNews24

TS 9

In Japan, cherry blossoms, or sakura, are the rock stars of the plant kingdom. People obsess over them, their rare public appearances send fans into a frenzy, and the most devoted enthusiasts will even follow their flowering tour as it spreads from Japan’s warmer southern prefectures to the chillier north.

But just as some music acts draw larger crowds than others, these three sakura trees are considered to be the absolute peak of the pink-flowered crowd.

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The Best Temples & Shrines of Japan

Meiji Jingu Shrine (Tokyo): Tokyo’s most venerable and refined Shinto shrine honors Emperor Meiji and his empress with simple yet dignified architecture surrounded by a dense forest. This is a great refuge in the heart of the city.

Meiji Jingu Shrine (Tokyo)

Sensoji Temple (Tokyo): The capital’s oldest temple is also its liveliest. Throngs of visitors and stalls selling both traditional and kitschy items lend it a festival-like atmosphere. This is the most important temple to see in Tokyo.

Sensoji Temple (Tokyo)

Stuffed Rolled Omelette – Mawaru Penguindrum

Rice Bowl – Every Anime. Ever.

Rice Bowl - Every Anime.  Ever.<br /><br /><br /><br />
I know, I know, a little lackluster after that last recipe, but it needed to be done.  Rice is such a staple of Japanese culinary culture, it’s hard to see a meal without it.  And as much as I tend to ignore it, there is a proper way to cook rice.  If you have the time, you really should cook rice this way.  There’s nothing wrong with just popping rice into a pot with some water, and turning the stove on, but the difference when you cook it this way is definitely noticeable (as my roommate will adamantly say).  Because so many dishes you find in Japan and in anime use rice, this is a really good guide to refer back to for cooking it (as I intend to do in future recipes—the main reason why I’m putting this here).<br /><br /><br /><br />
Ingredients<br /><br /><br /><br />
Short grain white rice (Sometimes, I’m out of short grain and just use medium grain white rice, but short grain is preferable.  Don’t use long grain, unless the recipe specifically calls for it)<br /><br /><br /><br />
Water<br /><br /><br /><br />
Directions<br /><br /><br /><br />
Rinse the rice.  You’ll need to do this several times.  Just put the rice (for most dishes, I use 1 cup of rice) into a bowl, add some water, and stir it around with your hands.  You’ll notice the water ends up kind of murky—that’s all just starch.  Then, strain the rice, and rinse it again.  Keep doing this until the water gets to be mostly clear.<br /><br /><br /><br />
Strain the rice once last time, and place it in the pot you’ll be cooking it in (unless you are using a rice cooker, then just leave it in the bowl).  Add two times the amount of water as there is rice—for example, 1 cup of rice means 2 cups of water, 1 1/2 cups of rice means 3 cups of water.  Then just let the rice soak in there for at least a hour.<br /><br /><br /><br />
Now we cook the rice!  If you’re using a rice cooker, just put the rice and water into the rice cooker and set to cook.  If not, were going to use the 5-5-5 rule to cook it:<br /><br /><br /><br />
Turn the stove top up to high and let the water come to a boil.  Once it does, turn the heat down to medium, and let it sit there for 5 minutes.<br /><br /><br /><br />
Turn the heat down to very low, and let it sit there for 5 minutes.<br /><br /><br /><br />
Then, turn the stove top off, and let it sit for another 5 minutes.<br /><br /><br /><br />
If the rice is still a little too moist, stir the rice a bit, and then put the rice back on low heat without the lid for a few more minutes, until the rice is to your liking.<br /><br /><br /><br />

Rice Bowl - Every Anime.  Ever.<br /><br /><br /><br />
I know, I know, a little lackluster after that last recipe, but it needed to be done.  Rice is such a staple of Japanese culinary culture, it’s hard to see a meal without it.  And as much as I tend to ignore it, there is a proper way to cook rice.  If you have the time, you really should cook rice this way.  There’s nothing wrong with just popping rice into a pot with some water, and turning the stove on, but the difference when you cook it this way is definitely noticeable (as my roommate will adamantly say).  Because so many dishes you find in Japan and in anime use rice, this is a really good guide to refer back to for cooking it (as I intend to do in future recipes—the main reason why I’m putting this here).<br /><br /><br /><br />
Ingredients<br /><br /><br /><br />
Short grain white rice (Sometimes, I’m out of short grain and just use medium grain white rice, but short grain is preferable.  Don’t use long grain, unless the recipe specifically calls for it)<br /><br /><br /><br />
Water<br /><br /><br /><br />
Directions<br /><br /><br /><br />
Rinse the rice.  You’ll need to do this several times.  Just put the rice (for most dishes, I use 1 cup of rice) into a bowl, add some water, and stir it around with your hands.  You’ll notice the water ends up kind of murky—that’s all just starch.  Then, strain the rice, and rinse it again.  Keep doing this until the water gets to be mostly clear.<br /><br /><br /><br />
Strain the rice once last time, and place it in the pot you’ll be cooking it in (unless you are using a rice cooker, then just leave it in the bowl).  Add two times the amount of water as there is rice—for example, 1 cup of rice means 2 cups of water, 1 1/2 cups of rice means 3 cups of water.  Then just let the rice soak in there for at least a hour.<br /><br /><br /><br />
Now we cook the rice!  If you’re using a rice cooker, just put the rice and water into the rice cooker and set to cook.  If not, were going to use the 5-5-5 rule to cook it:<br /><br /><br /><br />
Turn the stove top up to high and let the water come to a boil.  Once it does, turn the heat down to medium, and let it sit there for 5 minutes.<br /><br /><br /><br />
Turn the heat down to very low, and let it sit there for 5 minutes.<br /><br /><br /><br />
Then, turn the stove top off, and let it sit for another 5 minutes.<br /><br /><br /><br />
If the rice is still a little too moist, stir the rice a bit, and then put the rice back on low heat without the lid for a few more minutes, until the rice is to your liking.<br /><br /><br /><br />

Chihayafuru

 

Chihayafuru-arata-wataya-37052829-640-360

Watch the anime online here or read the manga here.

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Bakuman

Watch Season 1  here

Watch Season 2  here

Watch Season 3  here

or Read the manga here

How to Draw Inuyasha and Kagome

how to draw inuyasha and kagome More

Gekkan Shoujo Nozaki-kun!

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